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determine prospects for peace or war. in visiting thailand and the philippines in october, i was reminded of the economic vitality of southeast asia and the fact that that tend countries comprise an asean represent now the fourth largest export market of the united states. these countries are center stage. we must stand firm with our friends throughout asia and actively pursue prospects for free trade and open sea lanes and other policies that will strengthen american economic growth. more broadly, we face the specter of global resource constraints, especially efficiencies of energy and food that could stimulate conflict and deepen poverty. we have made startling gains in domestic energy production, but we remain highly vulnerable still to our dependency on oil, and perhaps equally important, even if we were able to produce more energy at home, we cannot isolate ourselves from energy shocks in the global economy. we have to cooperate with other nations in improving the global system of manufacturing and moving energy supplies. currently, a key to this is helping to assure the completion o
was in the philippines when world war ii started. and sure enough he's captured by the japanese. frank buckles was held in a prisoner of war camp by the japanese for 3 1/2 years and was finally released when americans liberated the philippines. after the war he moved to west virginia and worked on the farm until he was 106 driving the tractor. frank buckles, the last surviving doughboy, lived half of our nation's history. so today we have an opportunity to remember frank buckles, these doughboys, other doughboys, and all those great americans who fought for america 100 years ago . the bill steashes a commission to commemorate the centennial of world war i. the commission will plan programs and activities to commemorate the 100th anniversary of that great war. time is short. the centennial for the start of world war 1 is in 2014 and many of our allies have already started planning different events. it must be noted that no federal funds will be spent for this commission. they have to raise their own money from private funds. madam speaker, in the last century there were four great wars for americans to
located in the philippines as a permanent cemetery restored, operated and maintained by the american battle monuments commission. as the american battle monuments commission currently operates and maintains other overseas veteran sem tears it's the most appropriate entity to having the important fantastic of honoring our fallen veterans who have been laid to rest at clark. title 2 of this legislation contains provisions that will enhance our ability to provide for the health care needs of our veterans. it includes a measure, which would direct v.a. in coordination with the department of defense to establish and maintain an open burn pit registry for veterans of iraq and afghanistan who may have been exposed to toxic kimcals and fumes by open burn pits during deployment. many veterans have returned home from combat in iraq and afghanistan with serious questions and grave concerns about the possible long-term health effects of burn pit exposure. it's my hope that by establishing this registry we can provide them the answers and assurances they seek to provide better ways to care for th
to work and during his work, he went to the philippines. when he was in the philippines, the japanese invaded in world war ii. he was captured and put in a prisoner of war camp for three and a half years. he was about to be executed and the americans came and liberated the camp and he along with the other prisoners of war came back to america. frank buckles went back to west virginia where he worked his farm and drove the tractor until he was 107, madam speaker. it was his decision and his life's goal that he would be instrumental in helping build a memorial on the mall for all of the veterans who served in the great world war i. i met him in 2007 and this project has been going on now for five years. to try to get approval to build this memorial for all veterans of the world war i on the mall. almost as long as the war took. and so he came to washington, d.c. a few years ago, this is a picture of him that was taken recently before he died at the age of 110 at the d.c. memorial thope mall. what that is is a monument and memorial to all the veterans from the district of columbia that s
to politics and government, my father came to this country from the philippines and he came here to live the american dream. he became a legal citizen, he was so proud of that. he met my mother, they got married, they raised a family, nine kids, now 28 grand kids. god bless my mother who is still alive. he started hits own business. he always gave ba back to his community. and he always believed in making this place he called home a better place for his children and grandchildren to live. and i think if he were alive today, and i'm sure he's looking down from heaven somewhere, he'd be very proud of his oldest son that to my knowledge is the first first-generation filipino american to serve in the united states congress. and i'm proud to be part of the asian american community. this has been a job for the past 14 years, having served in the state legislature for 10 years and now in congress for four years, that i've taken very seriously and i've tried to give it my all, 100%. and as i've dedicated my life to. and i want to thank my family for all the sacrifices that they have made to allo
working with us. the president and treasury secretary baker were in japan and visited philippines and indonesia. so he calls baker and i'm assuming it's about 12 hours difference. he said jim, the president's going to love this bill. he said he's really going to love it. and there's pause and baker is talking. jim, just tell him to shut up. his friends are not going to like this bill and are going to want to get to him but the president is going to like it and don't say anything to him until we can brief him. that's the way the bill passed and that was the process. >> that was the process back in 1986. can that be the process today? feels like a different environment. >> sort of watching "lincoln." when politics worked. i don't know. we are in the middle of a political test of wills on marginal tax rates and funny we aren't fighting the underlying principle, wealthy people ought to pay more and get our economy back on track. right now the president thinks he was vindicated by his victory and wants republicans to give on marginal tax rates and they don't want to do that. but he has
with condolences from australia, great britain, thailand, the philippines, members of the european union and other countries. we spoke with connecticut congressman jim time on this morning's "washington journal." >> among the many statements put out yesterday by congressmen and senators was this from representative jim himes in connecticut, replacing -- releasing a statement saying the "words cannot express the sadness and horror i feel at the horrendous shootings in connecticut. host: representative himes joins us by phone. where were you when you first heard about the shooting? guest: i was in washington. host: you are in the fourth district. this was in the fifth district, correct? the coat the town is just across the line to the fifth district, currently represented by chris murphy. it is part of fairfield county, just across the line from my district. host: your thoughts on the safety of the children going to school there? guest: that is a question on every parent's mind today. , and one of the interesting aspects of yesterday's events was set the school recently installed a security system t
know your initiative is known as the partisanship. i will never forget in the philippines, your efforts on the floor -- you had this amazing ability and sense of purpose in finding common ground and reaching out to people on both sides of the aisle. every member of the committee has joined in presenting new resolution, and i just want to read, just the introduction. to route his 36 years in the united states senate, richard lugar has served indiana and the united states with grace, distinction, and testing, and will have many more contributions to the nation that he reveres. we want to present this to you. [applause] >> thank you. thank you very much. mr. chairman, i thank you very much. i am very grateful to have this opportunity -- to have had the opportunity to serve with each and everyone of you. thank you for this special privilege. >> finally, we are also going to be losing jim webb and jim demint. jim came here and did something that very few freshmen can do a getting a major piece of legislation passed, the new gi bill. on the committee, he has been critical to our thinking abou
Search Results 0 to 7 of about 8